Kiddie Park at Wyandotte County Lake Park

Location:  91st Street & Leavenworth Road in Kansas City, Kansas.  There are tons of signs to get to the park itself.  Once you enter the park, turn left (you’ll have a choice of left or right), and the Kiddie Park is on your left.  It’s easier to enter the park from the parking area by the ranger station (before the park); there’s also parking on the far side of the Kiddie Park.

Cost:  Free!

Web site: http://www.wycokck.org/Dept.aspx?id=16198&banner=15284

A distance shot of the Kiddie Park at Wyandotte County Lake Park

The Kiddie Park has slides galore, a set of swings, four teeter-totters and a carousel.

When we have time and energy and the weather’s agreeable, we take Peanut to the Kiddie Park at Wyandotte County Lake Park.  It’s got swings and a variety of play equipment, and it’s usually not too terribly busy–there’s plenty of playground to go around, and there’s usually not so many kids that Peanut gets overwhelmed (of course, we haven’t been there on a weekend yet, so it might just be the times and days that we’re going).

The Kiddie Park is restricted to ages 14 and under on all play equipment, although parents can often be found on or near the equipment keeping an eye on their kids.  The two large pieces of play equipment are separated by age-appropriateness:  older kids on the tall piece, younger kids on the small one.

 

Efrit stands on the steps next to a platform where Peanut rests after his climb up the large piece of play equipment.

Efrit follows Peanut up the large piece of play equipment. A toddler needs a rest after that climb!

The tall piece of equipment frankly scares me; this is probably because I’m a) paranoid and b) the parent of a 22-month-old who thinks he’s a monkey.  It’s very tall and has some fabulous slides for older children.  The staircase is open, as in there’s nothing between the risers to keep said monkey from slipping between them in a moment of clumsiness.  The bars on the safety railing are also farther apart.  I’m inclined to say it’s an older piece of equipment, although it’s in good condition–it’s all metal and reminds me of stuff that was around when I was a kid.

The "small" piece of playground equipment. This view shoes slides and two of the 'games' from a ramp onto the equipment.

The "small" piece of play equipment is more toddler-friendly.

The smaller piece of playground equipment is newer and more toddler-appropriate.

Peanut toddles to the bottom of the small piece of play equipment. Under the slides, there's a little play house.

Peanut toddles towards the bottom of the taller side of the toddler-appropriate play equipment. The base of this side of the structure is designed to be a play house of sorts, with windows and such.

There are slides in a variety of sizes, some very short and not-too-steep for beginning sliders.

Peanut tries to climb up a green spiral slide while Phouka looks on.

Peanut attempts to climb the spiral slide. On this piece of play equipment, the slides are plastic rather than metal. The top of the picture shows two different walking surfaces--the one at the right can be tricky.

There’s a ramp up to the lowest level in case your little one’s not up to walking it yet or needs to wheel up to some of the manual toys.  As you can see in the photo to the left, there’s a tic-tac-toe game and another matching game set into the bars; there are steering wheels and a noise-making wheel for turning; echo tubes (as best Efrit and I can figure out) for hearing your voice change; a ‘bounce bar’ to stand and gyrate on; a balance beam and monkey bars.

Phouka watches Peanut climb the stairs.

Phouka watches Peanut climb the stairs. Here, the handrails are close enough together for his little arms.

The steps here do have grates between the risers and the bars are closer together, so it’s safer for little guys to try out their climbing muscles.

The best part of the Kiddie Park is not the park itself but rather the area directly across the street:  it is a waterfowl hangout.

Geese at the lake

Geese swim close to shore at Wyandotte County Lake.

I have never been to the park and not seen birds in this area–usually lots of them. There are Canada Geese at the moment, but there are often several species of ducks joining them in warmer months. The ground is uneven in places, given the imprints of a variety of feet, and there’s water, so it’s a good idea to be careful with unsteady or very visually-impaired walkers.  There are benches to sit on and enjoy the birds, although you are not supposed to feed them.

Canada Geese cruise by on the lake.

Canada Geese cruise by on the lake.

Canada Geese are large, noisy birds, and at the lake, they tend to be in large groups.  This means that they’re reasonably easy to see–my vision-impaired toddler happily said “Duck!” and sped to the edge of the lake–and definitely easy to hear.  It’s a fun trip to visit the park and see the wildlife, then walk over and explore the Kiddie Park that’s conveniently located across the street.

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This entry was posted in Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas City Metro Area and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Kiddie Park at Wyandotte County Lake Park

  1. Pingback: Playground by East Entrance of Deanna Rose Children’s Farmstead | Peanut and Phouka's Adventures

  2. Pingback: Mr. & Mrs. F. L. Schlagle Environmental Library | Peanut and Phouka's Adventures

  3. Kim Woolery says:

    Hi! I work for the Kansas City, Kansas Public Library and I was wondering if we could have permission to use the photo above (img_1708.jpg) as the background in a display panel at our Mr. & Mrs. F. L. Schlagle Library. It’s really beautiful!

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