Maxim Breakdown

The phrase “we look with our eyes, not with our hands” echoes through my childhood.  This was told to me over and over again as my eyes lit up with joy and my fingers reached out to touch whatever fascinating object was before me.

Enter my current problem:  Peanut has the same wide-eyed wonder and desire to touch as any other child.  This has made getting through stores challenging, as he wants to touch everything, just like any other kid.  Even as my childhood maxim comes to my lips, however, I realize that it’s inappropriate:  my kiddo looks with his hands, not with his eyes.

Does anyone have suggestions on how to handle this?  “Hands to yourself” doesn’t seem to be working, and he knows enough to respond to a thoughtlessly-uttered “we look with our eyes, not with our hands” with a quick, “but I look with my hands, not with my eyes!”  I need a way to explain to a very bright almost-4-year-old that there are times when it’s appropriate to touch everything in sight and times when it’s not, and to do so in such a way that I’m not thwarting his exploration of  his environment as a B/VI child.  Help?

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Random Thoughts and Observations and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Maxim Breakdown

  1. ksubin@aol.com says:

    There are things that none of us should touch.

    Paintings in a museum Lava The gun on an officer’s belt A scorpion, black widow, wasp or poison dart frog, to name a few

    There are things that are hard or impossible for us to touch (in our daily life):

    Clouds The horizon Tops of mountains A neuron, atom or microorganism A “drop” of liquid

    The above things, and others that fit in tho categories (too big, too small, too delicate, too priceless/one of a kind, too dangerous…) are the items we use tactile graphics to convey meaning, along with lots of conversation.

    Kathy

    Sent from my iPad

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s