Adventures in Reading: Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

The front cover of Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

The front cover of Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

I’m not sure how I’d missed Chicka Chicka Boom Boom up until now.  I’d heard about it, sure, but never felt particularly moved to pick it up.  A few months ago, during a wait at a local library, I wandered over and picked up a copy, read through it, and still didn’t understand the lure.  Then, last week, on a whim, I picked up a copy at our library for my daughter–and oh my goodness, I see what the buzz is about.

 

Two of the interior pages of the book. The bending black shape on the right page is the trunk of the coconut tree.

Two of the interior pages of the book. The bending black shape on the right page is the trunk of the coconut tree.

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, written by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault, is illustrated in bright, high-contrast illustrations by Lois Ehlert. Each pair of pages has a brightly colored border, a bit of text, and brightly-colored letters around a stylized coconut tree–it definitely qualifies as a children’s book with high-contrast illustrations.  What makes this book amazing, though, is how kids respond to it:  any time I pick this book up to read it to Peanut and Sprout, I end up reading it to them at least three times.  Peanut’s even got part of it memorized–all this in under two weeks.

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom is fun to read and fun to hear because of the rhythms and rhymes of the words.  The illustrations are bright and colorful–ideal for VI kids like Peanut who need high-contrast–and they’d be easy to adapt to make them tactile (the NBP even offers a tactile letter set as a companion to the book).  My little guy and gal have fallen in love with this book, and it’s definitely one I’ll be adding to our library.

You can pick up a twin vision copy of the book, in contracted or uncontracted braille, at the National Braille Press for $7.99:  http://www.nbp.org/ic/nbp/BC1004-CHICKA.html

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